Sunday, 29 November 2015



FILM 1430: THE END OF THE TOUR

TRIVIA: In the scenes filmed at the home of Wallace (Segel) meat had to be placed in the pants of both David Foster Wallace (Segel) and David Lipsky (Eisenberg) in order to have the dogs all over them. In the scenes where the dogs woke up Lipsky (Eisenberg) peanut butter was also placed on his face, again, in order to attract the dogs.

Although this is never made clear or followed up on in the movie, David Lipsky never published the article he was assigned to write on David Foster Wallace in Rolling Stone. He did conduct five days of interviews with Wallace in 1995, but upon his return to New York, Rolling Stone reassigned him to other stories that they deemed more urgent (including rock star Shannon Hoon's drug overdose death). After Wallace's death in 2008, Lipsky unearthed the interview tapes and wrote a book based on them titled "Although Of Course You End Up Becoming Yourself: A Road Trip with David Foster Wallace."

David Lipsky's book was the main resource used by the screenwriter. Lipsky's tapes, which play a large part in the movie, were only used as a resource for the cast and crew during their research of the characters.

The song heard on the soundtrack when the film ends is "The Big Ship" by Brian Eno, one of David Foster Wallace's favorite songs.

Throughout the movie, people ask David Lipsky about "Jann". For example, Wallace asks him at the start of their interview, "What does Jann want," and says as Lipsky is leaving, "Say hi to Jann for me." This is Jann S. Wenner, the cofounder and editor-in-chief of Rolling Stone Magazine. Although Wenner was always unusually well-known in the general culture for a magazine publisher, he had been especially prominent in the news during the period just prior to the time when Lipsky went to interview Wallace because Wenner had recently left his wife of two decades (also an executive at Wenner Media) for a much younger man. Although they separated in 1995, Jann and Jane Wenner did not actually get divorced until 2011, after same-sex marriage became legal in New York.

The two women with whom Wallace and Lipsky hang out in Minnesota are both played by daughters of international celebrities: Julie is played by Maimie Gummer (a daughter of Meryl Streep) and Betsy is played by Mickey Sumner (one of Sting's daughters).




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