Monday, 7 December 2015



FILM 1433: ANT-MAN

TRIVIA Originally the film was meant to focus on the original Ant-Man, Hank Pym. However, the filmmakers deemed Pym as having a too family-unfriendly history (Pym developed several split personalities, one of whom abused his girlfriend Janet) and instead decided to focus on Pym's successor Scott Lang, with Pym becoming a mentor and supporting character.

Paul Rudd stated in an interview with New York Times columnist Tom Riddle that he purchased a massive ant farm and watched how the ants worked together. He was so inspired by them that he decided to keep the farm after the filming was complete.

Director Edgar Wright, a big fan of Ant-Man, proposed the film to Marvel in 2003, describing it as "an action-adventure comedy; a cross-genre action and special effects bonanza." He had been developing the movie since then, shooting a test reel, hiring the cast, and was close to begin shooting the movie. However, in 2014, he dropped out due to 'creative differences' between him and Disney, which had bought out Marvel Studios 5 years prior.

Posters for "Pingo Doce," the Brazilian soda company Bruce Banner worked for in The Incredible Hulk (2008), can be seen in the San Francisco scenes.

The laser sounds fired from Yellowjacket's suit are the same sound as the main gun on an AT-AT being fired in the Star Wars movies. Disney of course owns Marvel and Star Wars.

According to Michael Douglas, the costume for Paul Rudd had to be altered because of his muscles. Rudd had gone on an extensive training and workout regimen in order to build the proper muscle size for a superhero, but Rudd had become so muscular, they had to soften his costume up.

Scott Lang suggests calling the Avengers to assist. In the comics Ant-Man was an original Avenger.

When Paul Rudd told his 9-year-old son he was going to be Ant-Man, his son said, "Wow, I can't wait to see how stupid that'll be."

Darren Cross jokes that the concept of a shrinking human sounds like a "tale to astonish." Ant-Man made his debut in the comic "Tales to Astonish" #27 (Jan. 1962).

Garrett Morris who portrays a cab driver in the film appeared as Ant Man in a Saturday Night Live (1975) sketch when Margot Kidder guest hosted. The sketch was a superhero cocktail party. When Ant-Man arrives, he's given a hard time by the other, more popular superheroes.

Stan Lee makes a cameo in the movie as the bartender who says a woman looks "stupid fine."




No comments:

Post a Comment