Saturday, 10 March 2018

FILM 1759: I, TONYA



FILM 1759: I, TONYA

TRIVIA: Allison Janney had seriously trained to become a figure skater throughout her childhood and adolescence. However, when she was 17, she accidentally walked into a sliding glass door and gravely injured her right leg. In 2014, during an interview on "Fresh Air," Janney told interviewer Terry Gross that her leg came close to being amputated. "I lost like three-quarters of my blood. I lost an artery and cut tendon....I was in the hospital for like seven--seven, eight weeks. I missed my first year of college. You know, and after that, of course, I didn't really--I didn't skate for a very long time."

Although Margot Robbie trained extensively for the role, she wasn't able to perform a triple axel, nor could a skating double be found as very few women figure skaters are able to perform the jump, producer Tom Ackerley stated, "There has been only six women since Tonya who have done a triple axel, even if there was one who was doing it today, she'd be training for the Olympics and couldn't risk doing it for the film." The jump was accomplished with the use of visual effects.

To prevent damaging her hair, Margot Robbie wears wigs as Tonya Harding. Surprisingly, the hair team used beer to achieve the "crunchy" permed look when regular hair products didn't produce the desired result.

Nancy Kerrigan stated in interviews relating to her Dancing with the Stars (2005) appearance that she wouldn't be seeing the movie despite not knowing how much of it would feature her, saying "I already lived through that."

Steven Rogers' script was featured on the 2016 Black List of the most-liked, unproduced scripts of the year.
Margot Robbie is five inches taller than Tonya Harding.

I, Tonya marks the third film Margot Robbie has features in in which breaking the fourth wall is a prominent part of the plot. The other two being The Wolf of Wall Street (2013) and The Big Short (2015). On I, Tonya and The Big Short her characters (Tonya Harding and, basically herself) speak to the audience, whereas her character in The Wolf of Wall Street (Naomi Lapaglia) does not.



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